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trawczi

What's on your mind?

it's better to be cool and dead than uncool and alive.

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InDesign: Grayscale PDF From a Color Layout

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Unread InDesign can convert colors to grayscale during the process you describe only if it can “get” to them. It does fine with any color created in InDesign itself (CMYK, RGB or Lab; process or spot), as well as placed color TIFFs and PSD files, even if the PSD has a spot color channel. However, InDesign won’t change placed color EPS and PDF images into grayscale.   The good news is, through a simple hack, you can force InDesign to convert those recalcitrant images too. Nick Hodge first wrote about this trick for InDesign 2.0 and it still works in both CS, CS2, and CS3.   He discovered that when any image is run through InDesign’s transparency flattener, the program has a chance to adjust its colors to conform to the type of Color Output (in this case, Composi...

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The History of Jazz: Chapter One

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A Great Day in Harlem is a famous photograph (above) taken by Art Kane in 1958, featuring many of the greatest jazz talents in one place, at one moment. (It was the basis of a wonderful 1994 documentary of the same title, which is worth tracking down.) Under http://www.harlem.org/ there's an interactive site which adapts the photograph to the web. Click over the image to learn more about each person in the photograph, including top listening picks. A must for jazz fans, and what an inspiration if you’re curious about learning more about these great musicians. The History of Jazz By Ted Gioia Chapter One: The Prehistory of Jazz The Africanization of American Music An elderly black man sits astride a large cylindrical drum....

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Fanbois treat criticism of favorite brands as threat to self-image

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Have you ever found yourself frothing at the fingertips while explaining why someone doesn't deserve to use an iPhone because of their deeply flawed sense of aesthetics? Have you been the type to declare that those who don't use Android are cylons who are under mind control from Cupertino? Or are you Peter Bright, turning up your nose at all of us while you wax on about the unappreciated genius of the Windows 7 Phone? You may think you're defending your favorite platform because it's just that good. But, according to a recently published study out of the University of Illinois, you may instead be defending yourself because you view criticisms of your favorite brand as a threat to your self image. The study, which will be published in the next issue of the Journal of Con...

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Hemingway ‘driven to suicide by the FBI’

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AE Hotchner said he believed the FBI’s monitoring of the Nobel Prize-winning author, over suspicions of his links to Cuba, “substantially contributed to his anguish and his suicide” 50 years ago. Hotchner wrote in The New York Times that he had “regretfully misjudged” his friend’s fears of federal investigators, which were dismissed as paranoid delusions for years after his death. In 1983 the FBI released a 127-page file it had kept on Hemingway since the 1940s, confirming he was watched by agents working for J. Edgar Hoover, who took a personal interest in his case. Hotchner described being met off a train by Hemingway in Ketchum, Idaho, in November 1960, for a pheasant shoot with their friend Duke MacMullen. Hemingway, strugg...

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9 Truths About Multitasking

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It happens all the time. A report or study comes out, somebody at a reputable publication like the New York Times or Harvard Business Review picks it up, and the next thing you know, generalizations that were never intended by the researchers are plastered all over the blogosphere. That’s exactly what’s happened with multitasking. Just check out some of these headlines: How and Why to Stop Multitasking, The Myth of Multitasking, The Backlash Against Multitasking, How to Kick the Multitasking Addiction, Multitasking Produces an Illusion of Competence … the stuff is literally everywhere. The problem is that most of that “multitasking is evil” stuff is more or less irrelevant, to say the least. Now, before you go off on me for making such a hereti...

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L.A. Noire - Rockstar Games takes the side of the good guys in its risky new police procedural.

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L.A. Noire is different. It's not like most video games developed by Rockstar. You don't play the outlaw running wild, free to kill, steal, and cause destruction. You're a cop. A good cop at that, determined to restore order to the violent streets of 1940s Los Angeles. L.A. Noire's not like most games. Sure, there are car chases, gunfights, and a point-tally to judge the quality of your police justice, but it's a slow-paced, meditative experience. The focus isn't on how good you are at scoring headshots with a pistol but instead your ability to read a suspect's face and determine if he or she is telling the truth, holding something back, or flat out lying. Using a brand new technology called MotionScan, L.A. Noire delivers pure performances from a talented group of actors. Ev...

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Tool developed to predict violence and aggression in children and teens.

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Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have developed a tool to rapidly assess the risk of aggressive and violent behavior by children and adolescents hospitalized on psychiatric units. Ultimately, they hope to use the questionnaire to improve treatment and prevention of aggressive behavior in schools and in the community. A study providing preliminary validation of the Brief Rating of the Child and Adolescent Aggression (BRACHA) tool is published online in the Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law. "Using the BRACHA could help hospitals cut down on violence," says Drew Barzman, MD, a child and adolescent forensic psychiatrist at Cincinnati Children's and lead author of the study. The study involved 418 children and teens who had bee...

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Daily acts of sexism go unnoticed by men and women.

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Nearly everyone can recognize the stereotypical scene of construction workers catcalling women as being sexist, but both men and women tend to overlook the more subtle daily acts of sexism they encounter, according to a recent study from Psychology of Women Quarterly. Things such as calling women "girls" but not calling men "boys" or referring to a collective group as "guys" are forms of subtle sexism that creep into daily interactions. The study helps not only identify which forms of sexism are most overlooked by which sex, but also how noticing these acts can change people's attitudes. "Women endorse sexist beliefs, at least in part, because they do not attend to subtle, aggregate forms of sexism in their personal lives," wrote authors Julia C. Becker and Janet K. Swim. "Many m...

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Stop on red! The effects of color may lie deep in evolution.

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Almost universally, red means stop. Red means danger. Red means hot. And analyzing the results in the 2004 Olympics, researchers have found that red also means dominance. Athletes wearing red prevailed more often than those wearing blue, especially in hand-to-hand sports like wrestling. Why? Is it random? Is it cultural? Or does it have evolutionary roots? A new study of male rhesus macaques strongly suggests it’s evolution. “The similarity of our results with those in humans suggests that avoiding red or acting submissively in its presence may stem from an inherited psychological predisposition,” says Dartmouth College neuroscientist Jerald D. Kralik, who collaborated on the study with his research assistants Sara A. Khan and William J. Levine, and anthropologist Seth D. Dobs...

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Naughty children - it's nature and nuture.

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Disregarding the rules and confrontational behaviours are commonplace with young children and can even arise in the first year of life. For some children, this trend will persist and become a character trait despite their parents’ best efforts to teach them obedience and respect for the rules. For some, it will be a precursor to violent and antisocial behaviors.   A new study concludes that a combination of genetic and environmental factors is at play. The longitudinal study was conducted on 597 pairs of twins who were tracked from the age of 20 months to 5 years of age. “It’s the first time a study on the subject is conducted on twins who were monitored year after year,” says Richard E. Tremblay, professor at the Universite de Montreal Department of Psycho...

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