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mkarwicki

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L.A. Noire - Rockstar Games takes the side of the good guys in its risky new police procedural.

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Unread L.A. Noire is different. It's not like most video games developed by Rockstar. You don't play the outlaw running wild, free to kill, steal, and cause destruction. You're a cop. A good cop at that, determined to restore order to the violent streets of 1940s Los Angeles. L.A. Noire's not like most games. Sure, there are car chases, gunfights, and a point-tally to judge the quality of your police justice, but it's a slow-paced, meditative experience. The focus isn't on how good you are at scoring headshots with a pistol but instead your ability to read a suspect's face and determine if he or she is telling the truth, holding something back, or flat out lying. Using a brand new technology called MotionScan, L.A. Noire delivers pure performances from a talented group of actors. Ev...

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Daily acts of sexism go unnoticed by men and women.

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Unread Nearly everyone can recognize the stereotypical scene of construction workers catcalling women as being sexist, but both men and women tend to overlook the more subtle daily acts of sexism they encounter, according to a recent study from Psychology of Women Quarterly. Things such as calling women "girls" but not calling men "boys" or referring to a collective group as "guys" are forms of subtle sexism that creep into daily interactions. The study helps not only identify which forms of sexism are most overlooked by which sex, but also how noticing these acts can change people's attitudes. "Women endorse sexist beliefs, at least in part, because they do not attend to subtle, aggregate forms of sexism in their personal lives," wrote authors Julia C. Becker and Janet K. Swim. "Many m...

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Risk, probability, and how our brains are easily misled

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Unread The World Science Festival's panel on Probability and Risk started out in an unusual manner: MIT's Josh Tenenbaum strode onto a stage and flipped a coin five times, claiming he was psychically broadcasting each result to the audience. The audience dutifully wrote down the results they thought he had seen on note cards, and handed them in when the experiment was over. Towards the end of the program, he announced there were low odds that even one person in the audience had guessed the right order of results. When he announced them, however, about a dozen people raised their hands, saying that was what they had written down. Is Tenenbaum psychic? The audience sprinkled with liars? Neither, according to Tenenbaum. Instead, we're the victims of our own tendency to exp...

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Naughty children - it's nature and nuture.

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Unread Disregarding the rules and confrontational behaviours are commonplace with young children and can even arise in the first year of life. For some children, this trend will persist and become a character trait despite their parents’ best efforts to teach them obedience and respect for the rules. For some, it will be a precursor to violent and antisocial behaviors.   A new study concludes that a combination of genetic and environmental factors is at play. The longitudinal study was conducted on 597 pairs of twins who were tracked from the age of 20 months to 5 years of age. “It’s the first time a study on the subject is conducted on twins who were monitored year after year,” says Richard E. Tremblay, professor at the Universite de Montreal Department of Psycho...

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Happy guys finish last, says new study on sexual attractiveness.

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Unread   Women find happy guys significantly less sexually attractive than swaggering or brooding men, according to a new University of British Columbia study that helps to explain the enduring allure of "bad boys" and other iconic gender types.   The study – which may cause men to smile less on dates, and inspire online daters to update their profile photos – finds dramatic gender differences in how men and women rank the sexual attractiveness of non-verbal expressions of commonly displayed emotions, including happiness, pride, and shame.   Very few studies have explored the relationship between emotions and attraction, and this is the first to report a significant gender difference in the attractiveness of smiles. The study, published online today...

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Four tips for better iPhone battery life

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Unread David Pogue from the New York Times recently got some tips on improving iPhone battery life from an Apple Store Genius. We've discussed how to get the most out of your iPhone's battery on TUAW before, but it's worth revisiting since both the iPhone itself and the software it runs have changed so much since the last time we discussed it. Three out of Pogue's four suggestions for improving battery life come straight from Apple's official battery life tips. First, he suggests turning off push email and setting email to fetch manually. Depending on how many email accounts you have, this could dramatically improve your battery life, but it also means you won't receive new messages until or unless you open the Mail app. Pogue's second suggestion was to turn off Location Se...

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Depression and negative thoughts

Unread We all have our ups and downs—a fight with a friend, a divorce, the loss of a parent. But most of us get over it. Only some go on to develop major depression. Now, a new study, which will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggests part of the reason may be that people with depression get stuck on bad thoughts because they're unable to turn their attention away.   People who don't recover from negative events seem to keep going over their troubles. "They basically get stuck in a mindset where they relive what happened to them over and over again," says Jutta Joormann, of the University of Miami. She co wrote the new study with Sara Levens and Ian H. Gotlib of Stanford University. "Even...

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Sync Gmail Contacts with Outlook 2007 or 2010

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Unread Outlook is a popular personal information manager (PIM) product of Microsoft while Gmail and its Contacts is a popular web based service provided by Google. So it’s understandably that both products won’t be compatible with each other by default. However, it seems that there is no effort been done by either Microsoft or Google to make migration or syncing between Outlook and Google Gmail Contacts easier.There are several third-party effort to develop a tool to sync contacts between Gmail and Outlook, most notably is GO Contact Sync. The GO Contact Sync allows automatic synchronization of contacts between Gmail and Outlook without the need to manual import and export via CSV or vCard file. However, the development of GO Contact Sync appears to have stopped, and thus a group of developer...

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InDesign: Grayscale PDF From a Color Layout

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Unread InDesign can convert colors to grayscale during the process you describe only if it can “get” to them. It does fine with any color created in InDesign itself (CMYK, RGB or Lab; process or spot), as well as placed color TIFFs and PSD files, even if the PSD has a spot color channel. However, InDesign won’t change placed color EPS and PDF images into grayscale.   The good news is, through a simple hack, you can force InDesign to convert those recalcitrant images too. Nick Hodge first wrote about this trick for InDesign 2.0 and it still works in both CS, CS2, and CS3.   He discovered that when any image is run through InDesign’s transparency flattener, the program has a chance to adjust its colors to conform to the type of Color Output (in this case, Composi...

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"Sleep on it" is an excellent, science-based advice, study finds.

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Unread                 In recent years, much sleep research has focused on memory, but now results of a new study by University of Massachusetts Amherst psychologist Rebecca Spencer and colleagues suggest another key effect of sleep is facilitating and enhancing complex cognitive skills such as decision-making. In one of the first studies of its kind, Spencer and postdoctoral fellow Edward Pace-Schott investigated the effects of sleep on affect-guided decision-making, that is decisions on meaningful topics where subjects care about the outcome, in a group of 54 young adults. They were taught to play a card game for rewards of play money in which wins and losses for various card decks mimic casino gambling.   Subjects ...

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